Just in case.
rogerwilkerson:

I don’t usually post full page ads but this is information that may come in handy…

Just in case.

rogerwilkerson:

I don’t usually post full page ads but this is information that may come in handy…

urbanrelationsinfo:

Trends In Apartment Renting

urbanrelationsinfo:

Trends In Apartment Renting

(via urbanplannerholic)

Particularly interesting.
theatlantic:

Still Confused About the Higgs Boson? Read This.
designcube:

For the designers out there

designcube:

For the designers out there

(via aleclikeswhales)

And don’t forget Athazagoraphobia.
mythologyofblue:

(davesearbymason)

And don’t forget Athazagoraphobia.

mythologyofblue:

(davesearbymason)

(via afuneralinmybrain)

Handy reference.
balnibarbi:

Your Weight in Outer Space (by Alan Mays)

Handy reference.

balnibarbi:

Your Weight in Outer Space (by Alan Mays)

(via interzonestolen)

It would be super cool if those were real crayons.
nevver:

Crayola Crayons Colors of the 20th Century, [Larger]

It would be super cool if those were real crayons.

nevver:

Crayola Crayons Colors of the 20th Century, [Larger]

ilovecharts:

Stay in school, kids.

ilovecharts:

Stay in school, kids.

(Source: comicbookalex)

theatlantic:

Confirmed: The Internet Does Not Solve Global Inequality

If you live in a rich country, the Internet has probably changed the way you consume (and produce) information. But when you look at global-scale knowledge production, things are as they ever were: the Anglophone world dominates with the United States doing the lion’s share of academic and user-generated publishing.

Those are the messages of the Oxford Internet Institute’s new e-book, Geographies of the World’s Knowledge, from which the above graphics were drawn. The book’s authors, Corinne Flick of the Convoco Foundation and the Institute’s Mark Graham and Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, reluctantly conclude that the Internet has not delivered on the hopes that it would make knowledge “more accessible.”

“Many commentators speculated that [the Internet] would allow people outside of industrialised nations to gain access to all networked and codified knowledge, thus mitigating the traditionally concentrated nature of information production and consumption,” they write. “These early expectations remain largely unrealised.” 

We’re not only talking about publishing in academic journals or Wikipedia. The researchers also sampled user-generated content on Google and found that rich countries, especially the United States, dominate the production of user content.

The fact of the matter is that people without money can’t afford to get the education necessary to publish in academic journals, Internet-enabled or not. The other fact of the matter is that the vast majority of people in very poor countries don’t spend their time producing content for free. Hope as we might, the Internet isn’t a magic wand that makes the world more equal. 

Read more. [Image: Oxford Internet Institute]

Seems irrational.
theatlantic:

How the Internet is Paying Tribute to Pi Day